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Reviews Database > DVD REVIEWS (F) > FUTURE JUSTICE (2014)
FUTURE JUSTICE (2014)
Published by David Carter on 2015/11/15 (510 reads)
FUTURE JUSTICE (2014)
Directed by Richard Griffin
Review by David Carter

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Released by MVD Visual/Scorpio Film Releasing
Running Time: 83 minutes
Rating: Not Rated
Color format: Color
Audio/Subtitles: 2.0 Stereo English
Region Code: 1, NTSC
Aspect Ratio: Widescreen
16:9 Enhanced: Yes
Special Features: Commentary track, short film
Trailer Online: Yes




Open in new windowRichard Griffin’s Scorpio Film Releasing specializes in the pastiche film, a genre I’ve started calling nostalgiasploitation. He’s by no means the only filmmaker working in this niche; which has practitioners ranging from microbudget amateurs to the mainstream cinema of Rob Zombie and Eli Roth. I’d rank Griffin’s oeuvre ahead of Roth’s artless imitations because Griffin is truly working in pastiche. His films are inspired by -- rather than simply copies of – classic horror and exploitation cinema. We’ve seen him tackle Hammer horror, fifties’ sci-fi, and other exploitation genres and his latest, FUTURE JUSTICE, adapts the post-apocalyptic genre. It is now available on DVD from MVD Visual.

Open in new windowTerrorist Python Diamond is awakened from cyro-prison on Saturn to be returned to Earth. As the man responsible for a devastating terrorist attack, the small crew of soldiers would prefer putting a bullet in him than escorting him through space, but they are duty-bound to see their mission to the end. The ship is unable to communicate with anyone as they approach the blue planet, and soon discover that things are vastly different than they left them. World War III has apparently decimated Earth, so the crew heads toward the only energy signatures they can find, reluctantly bringing Python with them.

It turns out to be a smart decision as Python helps them hook up with a group of survivors in a fortified basement. The victory is short-lived, as a group of scavengers led by the demented Gazebo soon begin laying siege to the compound to get their hands on their cache of supplies. Python helps the group defend themselves from the onslaught but they are forced to form an uneasy alliance with Gazebo and his men when they discover a far worse threat lurking in the tunnels below the building.

Open in new windowFUTURE JUSTICE synthesizes the influence of movies like ESCAPE FROM THE BRONX into a film that is simultaneously familiar and brand new. FUTURE is a film that could have been released in 1982 and would have been a hit at grindhouses and drive-ins, and for that reason it will be well received by fans of that style of filmmaking. Griffin’s films excel in characterization, and this one is no exception. Simply adding in small details to make the characters believable goes a long way in any film genre, but it is so rare in horror/exploitation that Griffin’s films stand out as among the best low budget efforts to come along in recent years. FUTURE JUSTICE is less tongue-in-cheek than some of his other films, but no less enjoyable overall.

The nice DVD presentation put together by MVD Visual contains a commentary track and a short film as special features. Perhaps the highest compliment that can be paid to a nostalgiasploitation film is that it feels like a natural continuation of the genre it mimics, and not a consciously constructed copy. FUTURE JUSTICE is the latest in a succession of films from Richard Griffin that do just that.
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